Gmaps Pedometer has gotten a ton of posts in the blogosphere over the past week. Basically what it does is tell you how far you’ve walked/ran over the course of a workout. It is nice, but the interface isn’t that easy to use and you can’t use your GPS with it.

sportsim

Well there is a product that does what you’d expect a service such as this to do called Sportsim. Unlike Gmaps Pedometer, Sportsim lets you save and catalog all your GPS activities, save background maps to your tracks, analyze your achievements, compare with heart rate data, get cumulative statistics of your training and replay simultaneously activities from same route. Even better, Sportsim is a community where you can create your own race, compete in races, share your recommended activity and explore and discover new places to train. I when ahead and downloaded the small client to see what was available in my area and right away I saw someone had a track from the Arizona Ironman. I was able to see their speed, heart rate and the elevation of the route. You can also search using the type of activity. If I’m interesting in cycling around the country and can see where users are biking, the route, the elevation changes and how long it may take me.

Gmaps Pedometer is really simple and many people might like that, but given how many weblogs have mentioned how impressive it is, you’d think here would be some love or Sportsim. Well I went to ESRI’s since Sportsim is build using ArcWeb Services to see if it was in their Showcase area. Unfortunately it wasn’t there. I clicked on Learn More About ArcWeb Services and was taken to the product page. Buried in a link on the right is information about the ArcWeb Services Challenge winners where Sportsim is featured. If you want to see some very impressive implementations of ArcWeb Services you really should check that out, but why ESRI isn’t pushing this more on the web is a shame. The Google Map API is nothing compared to what ArcWeb Services, but time and time again you get posts about how bloggers are very impressed with Google Map applications that are very similar to what ESRI was doing 5 years ago.

I’m looking forward to seeing what ArcWeb Services are featured during the ESRI User Conference, but I suspect none of them be blogged about as much as Gmaps Pedometer.