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ESRI Releases JavaScript API v1.4

Looks like ESRI got out JSAP v1.4 just before the weekend. Some items of note:

Enhancements to the ESRI JavaScript API (this is inside the JSAPI, not the ESRI ArcGIS Server JavaScript API Bing Maps for Enterprise Extender) include a new BingTiledLayer and support for the Bing Maps for Enterprise Geocoder. Great news for those who have built their practice on Bing, but would rather use the ESRI JSAPI (because isn’t it better to admit you work with the ESRI JSAPI than the Bing Maps for Enterprise API?). It also includes support for the ArcGIS Server Network Extension for routing, some really neat graphic rendering and much more (including the bug in IE7). So if you’ve got nothing going on this weekend, check it out and get a jump on next week. (just change your code to reference 1.4).

Me? I’m going to order myself up some nice Harry & David Bing Cherry Chocolate Cheesecake and celebrate!

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Bing Maps for Enterprise?

No way, no how will I ever refer to Virtual Earth as Bing Maps for Enterprise. I’m putting my foot down on this.

I don’t want to talk to you no more, you empty-headed animal food trough water! I fart in your general direction! Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries!

I dont want to talk to you no more, you empty-headed animal food trough water! I fart in your general direction! Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries!

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Google I/O News

I suppose there is some sort of Google event going on this week and what do you know, we’ve got some GoogleGeo news:

Google Maps API v3 – The new Google Maps API v3 enables support on mobile browsers (such as Mobile Safari), dropping the need for keys (hurray!), now MVC-based architecture (about time), default UI automatically supported (so you never have to worry about updating the UI), cleaned up namespaces (everything is now google.maps.* rather than gmap). So what does this mean? Take a look at the old v2 example.

   
    
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
      
        <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
        Google Maps JavaScript API Example
        <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?file=api&v=2&key=abcdefg&sensor=true_or_false">http://maps.google.com/maps?file=api&v=2&key=abcdefg&sensor=true_or_false
        
    
        function initialize() {
          if (GBrowserIsCompatible()) {
            var map = new GMap2(document.getElementById("map_canvas"));
            map.setCenter(new GLatLng(37.4419, -122.1419), 13);
            map.setUIToDefault();
          }
        }
    
        
      
      <body onload="initialize()" onunload="GUnload()">
        <div style="width:500px;height:300px;" id="map_canvas">

And now v3.

    
    
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    
        <meta name="viewport" content="initial-scale=1.0, user-scalable=no" />
    <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/api/js?sensor=false">http://maps.google.com/maps/api/js?sensor=false
    
    //
    
        
    
    <body onload="initialize()">
        <div style="width:100%;height:100%;" id="map_canvas">

I like the new look and for me it is much more logical than before (plus mobile browser support FTW!). Check out the documentationand the reference. This coupled with the Google Maps Data API really pushes the Google Maps WAY in front of Microsoft and others.

Become Google Certified? So they have this new Google “Qualified Developer” program now. Looks like you pick a Google API (the page listing them seems 404, but I’m sure maps is going to be one), take some test and then show references and community participation. Much like other developer programs, they’ll have a directory to find “qualified” developers and probably some logos to put on your blog/homepage. Something tells me there will be a ton of people rushing out to get this done. The Javascript API Study Guide (I suppose the Flash Study Guide is on its way) seems to be very strait forward and since it is free, probably worth doing.

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OpenGeo releases OpenGeo Suite, puts price on Open Source GIS

OpenGeo has released their OpenGeo Suite to the public. Most people already know about the part of OpenGeo Suite, so take a look at the Version Matrix with pricing and features and the big reason why you’d look at this suite.

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Direct from Where 2.0 2009 – “Junk Mail” and the GeoWeb Shine Light on New Orleans Recovery

The video from our Where 2.0 presentation is available. If you haven’t been following what the GNOCDC is doing down in New Orleans, this is a great introduction. You can download the presentation here.

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Get your ArcGIS Map Templates at the new ESRI Resource Center

Map Templates Resource Center

Something ESRI should have done when 8.x arrived.

The new resource center

The new resource center

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GSS – Style your web maps with CSS client side

As Steve pointed out, this is does deserve two exclamation points!!

Just like CSS for styling web pages, GSS is a specification for designing maps. Adapted for dynamic data sources, GSS can define changing geographic elements, display multiple datasets, and even respond to contextual tags like “condition:poor”.

Very tasty! Just look at this simple GSS and how you can render maps on the client.

body: {
fillStyle: "#fff",
lineWidth: 0,
},

node: {
fillStyle: "#ddd",
strokeStyle: "#090",
lineWidth: 0,
radius: 1
},

way: {
strokeStyle: function() {
return "rgba(1,1,1,0.7)"
//return color_from_string(this.user)
},
strokeStyle: "#ccc",
lineWidth: 3
},

leisure: {
fillStyle: "#2a2",
lineWidth: 3,
strokeStyle: "#181"
}

Previous conversation about styling GIS data.

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Off to Where 2.0

http://conferences.oreilly.com/where

I’m heading off to Where 2.0 in a couple of hours to present a talk with the GNOCDC on the work we’ve done with the web mapping technology.

“Junk Mail” and the GeoWeb Shine Light on New Orleans Recovery

If you’d like to have some beers, feel free to connect with me using the networking dashboard. I’m already planning on meeting a ton of folks who normally don’t roam in my “professional” GIS conference circuit. See you guys there!

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Using ArGIS Desktop’s Map Service Publishing Toolbar

One of the best new features of ArcGIS 9.3.1 is the Map Service Publishing toolbar in ArcMap. This tool helps you analyze your maps to see what is slowing the map down. No longer are you having to look for the needle in the haystack. You just activate the toolbar and hit analyze. Then ArcMap returns all the errors and warnings associated with your mxd.

The new Map Service Publishing toolbar in action.

The new Map Service Publishing toolbar in action.

If you double click on any of the “issues” it will take you to documentation explaining the problem and how to fix it.

ArcGIS Server documentation helps figure out how to fix problems.

ArcGIS Server documentation helps figure out how to fix problems.

One other feature about the toolbar which is a big help is the preview. You can preview any map on how it would be served in ArcGIS Server, from right inside ArcMap. You also get a timer to show how long it took to generate that request. This is of course helpful for the ArcGIS Server services, but can even be used to speed up ArcMap documents that are only going to be consumed on the desktop. If you’ve been working with a mxd that seems to be loading slowly, now you have the tools you need to debug why the map isn’t performing quickly enough.

The Preview ArcGIS Server window allows users to determine the speed at which their maps are rendering.

The Preview ArcGIS Server window allows users to determine the speed at which their maps are rendering.

The toolbar also allows you to generate the Map Service Definition (.msd) files and even publish directly to ArcGIS Server from ArcMap (bypassing the need to go to ArcCatalog or the web manager).

The Map Service Publishing toolbar is really a great addition to the ESRI workflows, both Desktop and Server. Looking back at some of our existing map services we had authored with ArcGIS Server, I was amazed at how easy it was to discover the problems and then address them. Coupled with the new MSD files, ArcGIS Server is really a speed demon these days.

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National Geographic TPQ converter

NOTE: PROJECT APPEARS DEAD

Remember TOPO! Pro for ArcGIS? Don’t bother using the Google if you don’t recall, because it is gone.

If you’ve invested tons of money in the state series then you’ll be happy to know that there is a tool that allows you to convert the TPQ files to JPEG with a world file. TPQ Converter allows you to use the USGS data on the State Series CDs by converting individual or all TPQs located in a directory to jpgs with a world file. Then you’ll be able to use the output with any GIS application you wish.

At my old company, we did have a most TOPO! states, but since I’ve moved to RSP, we’ve just used web services.