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Thoughts

ZDNet – Google Map API transforms the Web

Link: Google map API transforms the Web – ZDNet.com via PubSub: Google Maps.

“We are getting a great demonstration right now of open source power, as applications using the Google Maps API begin to appear. Mapquest, owned by AOL, has been around for many years, but it’s a proprietary offering. Yahoo Maps has been around for years, but it has been late to this party. It’s Google, using the open source process, that has blown the field apart. The code has only been out a few weeks but already we’re seeing several really great applications.”

Yea, yea Google Maps API is great, but yet another article that doesn’t mention ESRI or their API. It isn’t open source, but they’ve had it much longer than Google has had theirs. But the point they do make at the end of the article is very true.

“And remember, this is just the start. I guarantee that hundreds of programmers are now poring over the Google Map API documentation, thinking about applications that will drive both them, and Google, to new heights.”

I hope we’ll hear an announcement at the ESRI UC that ESRI will release a version of their ArcWeb Services API that these programmers can freely use. If it is features these programmers need and what for their applications, it is ArcWeb Services that can deliver it today, not Google Maps.

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Thoughts

The Cost of ESRI Products Causes Potential Users to Turn Elsewhere

Link: Guns, Germs, and Steel and GMaps Census (dead link).

“A quick word on GIS software: ESRI’s ArcGIS is the industry standard, but it can be a challenge to learn and costs way too much. My wife, who does some GIS in her research at the Prevention Research Center in Berkeley, has recently become a big fan of another software called Maptitude. It’s extremely intuitive and an order of magnitude cheaper than ArcGIS.”

I posted about this a couple weeks ago as well as my posts about opening up ArcWeb Services to more users. People want to use ESRI products, but the first word out of their mouths is always it costs too much and in many cases it does. ArcExplorer is about the only free tool that ESRI offers to get into GIS. Compared to products such as Google Earth and the many open source GIS tools, it is very weak and not worth mentioning.

It appears that most users are willing to spend about $500 for a professional GIS system, but their choices are very limited.

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Thoughts

Google Maps API is the entry into GIS that ESRI should take advantage of

The more I look at the Google Maps API and see the wide array of sites users are creating I can’t help but think of the opportunity that ESRI has to grow their ArcWeb Services. There are quite a bit of bright programmers who are using Google Maps as their introduction to “GIS” and they seem to love it. These programmers can do so much more with the more robust ArcWeb Services, but I’ve seen no out reach from ESRI on how to help these new GIS programmers get involved with ESRI GIS. Many of them are in school and most likely already have ESRI site license that they can tap into and learn how to program with the ESRI software suite. When they graduate, they’ll be available to the GIS marketplace and with some great ideas to help push ArcGIS beyond just a tool used by government agencies. ESRI can easily offer up a simple map to allow users to hook into it and learn how to create ArcWeb Services programs.

I can’t imagine this would be too much of a cost to ESRI, but the benefit of all the new ArcWeb Services on the Internet would only fuel increased ESRI profits in the future. ESRI can sit and watch the Google Maps API revolution or take it upon them to be part of it. Google Maps isn’t open source and it has been embraced by the open source programmer crowd. ESRI products run on open source and use some open source programming languages so it seems a natural fit for these uses to flock to ESRI. All they want is an easy to use way of creating these web applications and the years of experience that ESRI has with web-based GIS will make the jump much easier than the Google Maps method that doesn’t understand much of what users have created.

Opening ArcWeb to more users makes sense to me.

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Thoughts

Sportsim introduces beta java applets viewer

Link: Gjermund’s Web: Cool, but what is this?.

I have to admit, this is yet another killer aspect of Sportsim. Not only can you generate races and courses, but you can post them to your own page via a java applet which includes the maps, participants, course time and elevation. Go ahead and click on the link above and check them out for yourself.

Categories
Thoughts

Sportsim introduces beta java applets viewer

Link: Gjermund’s Web: Cool, but what is this?.

I have to admit, this is yet another killer aspect of Sportsim. Not only can you generate races and courses, but you can post them to your own page via a java applet which includes the maps, participants, course time and elevation. Go ahead and click on the link above and check them out for yourself.

Categories
Thoughts

Like Gmaps Pedometer? Try ArcWeb powered Sportsim

Gmaps Pedometer has gotten a ton of posts in the blogosphere (dead link) over the past week. Basically what it does is tell you how far you’ve walked/ran over the course of a workout. It is nice, but the interface isn’t that easy to use and you can’t use your GPS with it.

Sportsimarcweb

Well there is a product that does what you’d expect a service such as this to do called Sportsim. Unlike Gmaps Pedometer, Sportsim lets you save and catalog all your GPS activities, save background maps to your tracks, analyze your achievements, compare with heart rate data, get cumulative statistics of your training and replay simultaneously activities from same route. Even better, Sportsim is a community where you can create your own race, compete in races, share your recommended activity and explore and discover new places to train. I when ahead and downloaded the small client to see what was available in my area and right away I saw someone had a track from the Arizona Ironman. I was able to see their speed, heart rate and the elevation of the route. You can also search using the type of activity. If I’m interesting in cycling around the country and can see where users are biking, the route, the elevation changes and how long it may take me.

Gmaps Pedometer is really simple and many people might like that, but given how many weblogs have mentioned how impressive it is, you’d think here would be some love or Sportsim. Well I went to ESRI’s since Sportsim is build using ArcWeb Services to see if it was in their Showcase area. Unfortunately it wasn’t there. I clicked on Learn More About ArcWeb Services and was taken to the product page. Buried in a link on the right is information about the ArcWeb Services Challenge winners where Sportsim is featured. If you want to see some very impressive implementations of ArcWeb Services you really should check that out, but why ESRI isn’t pushing this more on the web is a shame. The Google Map API is nothing compared to what ArcWeb Services, but time and time again you get posts about how bloggers are very impressed with Google Map applications that are very similar to what ESRI was doing 5 years ago.

I’m looking forward to seeing what ArcWeb Services are featured during the ESRI User Conference, but I suspect none of them be blogged about as much as Gmaps Pedometer.

Categories
Thoughts

Like Gmaps Pedometer? Try ArcWeb powered Sportsim

Gmaps Pedometer has gotten a ton of posts in the blogosphere (dead link) over the past week. Basically what it does is tell you how far you’ve walked/ran over the course of a workout. It is nice, but the interface isn’t that easy to use and you can’t use your GPS with it.

Sportsimarcweb

Well there is a product that does what you’d expect a service such as this to do called Sportsim. Unlike Gmaps Pedometer, Sportsim lets you save and catalog all your GPS activities, save background maps to your tracks, analyze your achievements, compare with heart rate data, get cumulative statistics of your training and replay simultaneously activities from same route. Even better, Sportsim is a community where you can create your own race, compete in races, share your recommended activity and explore and discover new places to train. I when ahead and downloaded the small client to see what was available in my area and right away I saw someone had a track from the Arizona Ironman. I was able to see their speed, heart rate and the elevation of the route. You can also search using the type of activity. If I’m interesting in cycling around the country and can see where users are biking, the route, the elevation changes and how long it may take me.

Gmaps Pedometer is really simple and many people might like that, but given how many weblogs have mentioned how impressive it is, you’d think here would be some love or Sportsim. Well I went to ESRI’s since Sportsim is build using ArcWeb Services to see if it was in their Showcase area. Unfortunately it wasn’t there. I clicked on Learn More About ArcWeb Services and was taken to the product page. Buried in a link on the right is information about the ArcWeb Services Challenge winners where Sportsim is featured. If you want to see some very impressive implementations of ArcWeb Services you really should check that out, but why ESRI isn’t pushing this more on the web is a shame. The Google Map API is nothing compared to what ArcWeb Services, but time and time again you get posts about how bloggers are very impressed with Google Map applications that are very similar to what ESRI was doing 5 years ago.

I’m looking forward to seeing what ArcWeb Services are featured during the ESRI User Conference, but I suspect none of them be blogged about as much as Gmaps Pedometer.

Categories
Thoughts

Like Gmaps Pedometer? Try ArcWeb powered Sportsim

Gmaps Pedometer has gotten a ton of posts in the blogosphere (dead link) over the past week. Basically what it does is tell you how far you’ve walked/ran over the course of a workout. It is nice, but the interface isn’t that easy to use and you can’t use your GPS with it.

Sportsimarcweb

Well there is a product that does what you’d expect a service such as this to do called Sportsim. Unlike Gmaps Pedometer, Sportsim lets you save and catalog all your GPS activities, save background maps to your tracks, analyze your achievements, compare with heart rate data, get cumulative statistics of your training and replay simultaneously activities from same route. Even better, Sportsim is a community where you can create your own race, compete in races, share your recommended activity and explore and discover new places to train. I when ahead and downloaded the small client to see what was available in my area and right away I saw someone had a track from the Arizona Ironman. I was able to see their speed, heart rate and the elevation of the route. You can also search using the type of activity. If I’m interesting in cycling around the country and can see where users are biking, the route, the elevation changes and how long it may take me.

Gmaps Pedometer is really simple and many people might like that, but given how many weblogs have mentioned how impressive it is, you’d think here would be some love or Sportsim. Well I went to ESRI’s since Sportsim is build using ArcWeb Services to see if it was in their Showcase area. Unfortunately it wasn’t there. I clicked on Learn More About ArcWeb Services and was taken to the product page. Buried in a link on the right is information about the ArcWeb Services Challenge winners where Sportsim is featured. If you want to see some very impressive implementations of ArcWeb Services you really should check that out, but why ESRI isn’t pushing this more on the web is a shame. The Google Map API is nothing compared to what ArcWeb Services, but time and time again you get posts about how bloggers are very impressed with Google Map applications that are very similar to what ESRI was doing 5 years ago.

I’m looking forward to seeing what ArcWeb Services are featured during the ESRI User Conference, but I suspect none of them be blogged about as much as Gmaps Pedometer.