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Apple’s Digital Twin is All About Augmented Reality

Now before we get too far, Apple has not created anything close to a Digital Twin as we know them. But what they have done is created an easy way to import your building models into Apple Maps. Apple calls this their Indoor Maps program.

Easily create detailed maps of your indoor spaces and let visitors see where they are right in your app. Organizations with large public and private spaces like airports, shopping centers, arenas, hospitals, universities, and private office buildings can register for the Indoor Maps Program. Indoor maps are built using industry standard tools and require only your existing Wi-Fi network to enable GPS-level location accuracy so visitors can navigate your spaces with ease.

Victoria Airport in the Apple IMDF Sandbox

OK, so clearly this is all about navigation. How do I know where I am in a building and how do I get to a place I need to be. Of course, this is somewhat interesting on your iPhone or iPad in Apple Maps, but clearly, there is more to this than just how do I find the restroom on floor 10 of the bank tower.

To load your buildings in Apple you need to use Mapkit or Mapkit.js and convert your buildings into Indoor Mapping Data Format (IMDF). IMDF is actually a great choice because it is GeoJSON and working toward being an OGC standard (for whatever that is worth these days). I did find it interesting that Apple highlights the following as the use case for IMDF:

  • Indoor wayfinding
  • Indoor routing
  • Temporal constraints
  • Connectivity amongst mapped objects
  • Location-based services
  • Query and find by location functionality

If you’re familiar with GeoJSON, IMDF will look logical to you:

{
  "id": "11111111-1111-1111-1111-111111111111",
  "type": "Feature",
  "feature_type": "building",
  "geometry": null,
  "properties": {
    "category": "parking",
    "restriction": "employeesonly",
    "name": {
      "en": "Parking Garage 1"
    },
    "alt_name": null,
    "display_point": {
      "type": "Point",
      "coordinates": [1.0, 2.0]
    },
    "address_id": "2222222-2222-2222-2222-222222222222"
  }
}

I encourage you to review the IMDF docs to learn more but we’re talking JSON here so it’s exactly how you’d expect it to work.

Because IMDF buildings are generalized representations of the real-world data, this isn’t actually a Digital Twin. It also means that you need to do some things to your files before converting them to IMDF. Autodesk, Esri, and Safe Software all support IMDF so you should be able to use their tools to handle the conversions. I’ve done the conversion with Safe FME and it works very well and probably the best way to handle this. In fact, Safe has an IMDF validator which does come in handy for sure.

Safe FME support of IMDF

What does make moving your buildings to Apple’s Indoor platform is the new iPhone 12 and iPad Pro LiDAR support. This brings out some really great AR capabilities that become enabled with Apple’s devices. As I said last week, the LiDAR support in the current devices is more about getting experience with LiDAR use cases than actual LiDAR use. This is all about eventual Apple Glass (and Google Glass too) support and the AR navigation that can be done when you have hyper-accurate indoor models in your mapping software.

I’ve been dusting off my MapKit skills because I think not only is this capability useful for many companies but it really isn’t that hard to enable. I am spending some time thinking about how to use the extension capability of IMDF to see how IoT and other services can be brought in. Given the generalized nature of IMDF, it could be a great way to allow visualizing IoT and other services without the features of a building getting in the way. Stay tuned!

Categories
Thoughts

The GIS Superhero Meme

Who can go to a spatial conference and not see the GIS superhero t-shirts, the presentations with superhero references and job ads claiming that if you work for them, you’ll be a GIS superhero.  It’s awkward right?

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5200/8412303424_e3e5f88e70.jpg

But where did this superhero meme come from?  I’ve been trying to determine what set this all off and I think the first modern (I’m sounding like a history professor here) reference to a GIS superhero was Safe Software back in 2011.

I’m guessing this showed up because of the FME 2011 beta screen.

If you search FME mailing lists you’ll find references to “FME Superhero” back as far as 2007.  It was all in jest or at least had the feeling that it was a bit of a joke.

But this all turned crazy when in 2012 at the ESRI UC, MapMan arrived apparently created by Daniel Gill.  After that moment, Esri conferences and meetups all had MapMan/MapGirl swag to buy or give away.  And with that GIS people started referring to themselves as superheros, hiring superheros and the rest.  I would have though this meme would die a quick death because it’s a bit ridiculous but if there is one thing GIS people love to do is oversell themselves.  Just use hashtag #mapman to see it all on your favorite social media network.

The GeoMonkey never had a meme. You left him behind.